2006年12月英语六级新题型模拟试题(1)
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大学英语六级新题型考试(一)
  COLLEGE ENGLISH TEST
  —Band Six—
  (6 MSH 2)
  Part I Writing(30 minutes)
  Directions: For this part, you are allowed 30 minutes to write a short essay entitled To Curb1 Spending? You should write at least 150 words following the outline given below:
  1. 现在许多大学生花钱大手大脚
  2. 有人认为社会整体生活水平提高了,大学生花钱多一些无可厚非
  3. 你的看法
                                                                                 
                                                                                  
                                                                                  
  Part ⅡReading Comprehension (Skimming and Scanning)(15 minutes)
  Directions: In this part, you will have 15 minutes to go over the passage quickly and answer the questions on Answer Sheet 1.
  For questions 14, mark
  Y (for YES)   if the statement agrees with the information given in the passage;
  N (for NO)   if the statement contradicts the information given in the passage;
  NG (for NOT GIVEN    )if the information is not given in the passage.
  For questions 510, complete the sentences with the information given in the passage.
  Even as the economy improves, a jobless executive may face up to a year or more of unemployment. This is a lot of time, especially for hard-charging high-performers who are not used to having any free time. While some job seekers spend hundreds—even thousands—of hours discovering daytime television, others seem to thrive on activities that boost their professional careers or resolve family issues when they aren’t working.
  Having an extended period of free time in the prime of one’s life can in fact be a unique opportunity to focus on volunteer service, professional education or personal growth.
  Community Involvement
  For Lisa Perez, the wakeup call was burned pork chops. An executive who previously2 hadn’t been particularly interested in home and health had become obsessed3 with homemaking during a stint4 of unemployment.
  She realized that cleaning and organizing her home wasn’t helping5 her job search. Nevertheless, “I made lists of 50 things to do every day,” says Ms. Perez, a political and public-relations consultant6 in Scottsdale, Ariz. “My house was spotless, just so I’d have something to do.”
  One day, her boyfriend didn’t arrive on time for dinner because he had to work late, and her pork chops were ruined. She threw a fit. “I’d never been a person like that,” she says. “So I decided7 to stop feeling sorry for myself, and go out and do something productive.”
  Ms. Perez, 35, resolved to become an active volunteer for the duration of her search. She gave her time to a health-care concern, a housing program and a political campaign.
  The work bolstered8 her self-confidence. “Volunteering takes the focus off of you. One thing you have that’s still valuable is your time. And, of course, you learn that there are thousands of people with a life that’s much worse than yours,” she says.
  Volunteer assignments are also great ways to meet powerful and well-connected people. Over a six-month period, her volunteering evolved into working as a paid consultant and then as a full-time9 employee, a job she still holds today. In all, she was unemployed10 for eight months.
  Before her job loss, she thought she didn’t have time to volunteer while working. “Now, even though I have a demanding job, I still volunteer, because of what I got out of it,” says Ms. Perez.
  Continuing Education
  Gene11 Bellavance, a 36-year?old information-technology project manager, took another route during his unemployment. When he was laid off from a steel company near Cleveland, he knew his immediate12 prospects13 were bleak14. He expected his search to take a year. He faced a decision: take a job that would set back his career or hold out for an offer he really wanted.
  Mr. Bellavance, single and virtually debt free, shifted his finances into survival mode. He cashed out his pension, sold his house, unloaded things he didn’t need at garage sales, and rented an apartment with a roommate. Then, he says, “I signed up for every benefit I could find.”
  But he wasn’t just waiting out the year. He spent the rest of his search updating his skills, including becoming certified15 in new database and project-management software. “You have to invest in yourself,” Mr. Bellavance says. “I estimated what technology was going to be the most beneficial and chose applications that were going to be pervasive16, that were right for my market, and that were going to ensure top pay.”
  In addition to income from the occasional IT-consulting assignment, he relied on a combination of displaced-worker-retraining grants and unemployment benefits. “I went out and found the classes, submitted the paperwork, and dealt with the bureaucracy. You have to stay after them, keeping your benefits moving forward. It’s up to you to make it work with your overall transition plan,” he says.
  His job search was one month shy of the full year he’d expected. He looked for work during his training and says he would have finished the certification programs even if he’d been hired before completing them.
  “People should not feel guilty” about accepting government aid, he says. “I saw this in a lot of people. They felt they were some kind of loser for taking benefits. My advice is: Get all you can. You’ve been paying for these programs in your entire career, and you may as well start to benefit from them.”
  Family Matters
  In addition to pursuing training or volunteering, some displaced careerists use their time off work to attend to family matters. Many executives rediscover their children or find time to help their parents.
  Stanford Rappaport held three jobs in San Francisco, including high-tech17 and teaching positions. When he was laid off from the high-tech job last year, he knew it might be a long slog before he could get another post like it in the Bay Area. “I was able to do the math,” says Mr. Rappaport, 46. “The number of people laid off: huge; and the number of available jobs: miniscule. At the time, I thought it might be two or three years before the tech industry recovered.”
  Mr. Rappaport’s remaining job, a part-time faculty18 position with City College of San Francisco, didn’t pay enough to support him. After a couple of months of searching with no results, he decided to escape the Northern California jobs meltdown. “My plan,” he says, “was to get out of an expensive living situation, and either seek work in another section of the U.S. or overseas, for those two years.” Mr. Rappaport, who speaks five languages, had worked overseas before.
  Before he found an assignment, his Arkansas-based mother was diagnosed with a serious chronic19 illness, and he was called into duty as a son. Mr. Rappaport was able to help his mother get her affairs in order not to interrupt his search by using a San Francisco mail drop and cellphone. “I continued to look for work in California while I was in Fayetteville, Ark., helping my mother through this crisis.”
  He took his mother to medical appointments, made repairs on her house, bought her a better car, and straightened out her legal and financial affairs. “I even got to go through my father’s effects, which in the five years since he had died were simply piled in boxes in his office,” he says.
  Mr. Rappaport’s stay in Arkansas lasted six months. “It’s amazing that at this stage I had the opportunity to spend a significant amount of time with my mother and improve her life and get a lot of things done for her. Most people never have that opportunity. I’m very thankful that I had the chance. It was absolutely worth it,” he says. 
  One of the unexpected benefits was the huge boost in confidence he gained from his role as caregiver. He’d been feeling depressed20 and defeated when he left California, but after returning, he felt renewed. He landed a job with a former employer after returning to San Francisco and remains21 a part-time faculty member.
  Discovery and Exploration
  Instead of spending time off lamenting22 your unemployed status, ask yourself: “Is there something I’ve always wanted to do but haven’t because of the demands of my job?”
  Felice Fisk, a 29?year?old in Seattle, recently left an account-manager position at a contract-furniture company. During seven months of unemployment, she took an interest in fine-art painting and completed 18 pieces before returning to work. “I found the art work, or some kind of creative outlet23, to be really beneficial,” she says. She’s now an interior designer for an interior-design firm.
  Michael Ross, 42, a former IT administrator24 in El Cerrito, Calif., recently spent his 10 months of unemployment playing guitar and exploring his lifelong interest in scriptwriting and the movie business. “After 18 years at my former employer and how hard I had worked, I knew I had to recover, to get restored,” he says. “I looked at this as an opportunity, rather than a penalty. This was very much about clearing space for me.”
  At the executive level, even a very efficient and successful job search may be quite lengthy25. It makes sense to spend that time in an enriching and productive manner. These job seekers pursued service, continuing education and shoring up family bonds. How you’ll look back on a period of unemployment depends on what you do with it.
  1. This passage mainly tells that being unemployed is not all bad.
  2. Lisa Perez found a new interest in homemaking during the period of unemployment.
  3. Lisa Perez was always optimistic during the period of her unemployment.
  4. After she got a new job, Lisa Perez regretted that she had not done volunteering work earlier.
  5. Unemployment means a lot of time, especially for those hard-charging executives who are not used to having any          time.
  6. Being a volunteer is helpful because volunteer assignments can provide you with chances to meet               people.
  7. Mr. Bellavance cashed out his pension, sold his house and unloaded things he didn’t need at garage after losing his job in order to change his finances into        mode.
  8. When unemployed, some careerists take the opportunity to      family matters in addition to pursuing training or volunteering.
  9. The role as caregiver brought about a huge boost in        to Mr. Rappaport. After returning from California, he felt renewed.
  10. Michael Ross resigned and spent his unemployment time playing guitar and exploring his lifelong interest in scriptwriting and the movie business for he looked at this as an            , rather than a penalty.
大学英语六级新题型考试(一)
  COLLEGE ENGLISH TEST
  —Band Six—
  (6 MSH 2)
  Part I Writing(30 minutes)
  Directions: For this part, you are allowed 30 minutes to write a short essay entitled To Curb Spending? You should write at least 150 words following the outline given below:
  1. 现在许多大学生花钱大手大脚
  2. 有人认为社会整体生活水平提高了,大学生花钱多一些无可厚非
  3. 你的看法
                                                                                 
                                                                                  
                                                                                  
  Part ⅡReading Comprehension (Skimming and Scanning)(15 minutes)
  Directions: In this part, you will have 15 minutes to go over the passage quickly and answer the questions on Answer Sheet 1.
  For questions 14, mark
  Y (for YES)   if the statement agrees with the information given in the passage;
  N (for NO)   if the statement contradicts the information given in the passage;
  NG (for NOT GIVEN    )if the information is not given in the passage.
  For questions 510, complete the sentences with the information given in the passage.
  Even as the economy improves, a jobless executive may face up to a year or more of unemployment. This is a lot of time, especially for hard-charging high-performers who are not used to having any free time. While some job seekers spend hundreds—even thousands—of hours discovering daytime television, others seem to thrive on activities that boost their professional careers or resolve family issues when they aren’t working.
  Having an extended period of free time in the prime of one’s life can in fact be a unique opportunity to focus on volunteer service, professional education or personal growth.
  Community Involvement
  For Lisa Perez, the wakeup call was burned pork chops. An executive who previously hadn’t been particularly interested in home and health had become obsessed with homemaking during a stint of unemployment.
  She realized that cleaning and organizing her home wasn’t helping her job search. Nevertheless, “I made lists of 50 things to do every day,” says Ms. Perez, a political and public-relations consultant in Scottsdale, Ariz. “My house was spotless, just so I’d have something to do.”
  One day, her boyfriend didn’t arrive on time for dinner because he had to work late, and her pork chops were ruined. She threw a fit. “I’d never been a person like that,” she says. “So I decided to stop feeling sorry for myself, and go out and do something productive.”
  Ms. Perez, 35, resolved to become an active volunteer for the duration of her search. She gave her time to a health-care concern, a housing program and a political campaign.
  The work bolstered her self-confidence. “Volunteering takes the focus off of you. One thing you have that’s still valuable is your time. And, of course, you learn that there are thousands of people with a life that’s much worse than yours,” she says.
  Volunteer assignments are also great ways to meet powerful and well-connected people. Over a six-month period, her volunteering evolved into working as a paid consultant and then as a full-time employee, a job she still holds today. In all, she was unemployed for eight months.
  Before her job loss, she thought she didn’t have time to volunteer while working. “Now, even though I have a demanding job, I still volunteer, because of what I got out of it,” says Ms. Perez.
  Continuing Education
  Gene Bellavance, a 36-year?old information-technology project manager, took another route during his unemployment. When he was laid off from a steel company near Cleveland, he knew his immediate prospects were bleak. He expected his search to take a year. He faced a decision: take a job that would set back his career or hold out for an offer he really wanted.
  Mr. Bellavance, single and virtually debt free, shifted his finances into survival mode. He cashed out his pension, sold his house, unloaded things he didn’t need at garage sales, and rented an apartment with a roommate. Then, he says, “I signed up for every benefit I could find.”
  But he wasn’t just waiting out the year. He spent the rest of his search updating his skills, including becoming certified in new database and project-management software. “You have to invest in yourself,” Mr. Bellavance says. “I estimated what technology was going to be the most beneficial and chose applications that were going to be pervasive, that were right for my market, and that were going to ensure top pay.”
  In addition to income from the occasional IT-consulting assignment, he relied on a combination of displaced-worker-retraining grants and unemployment benefits. “I went out and found the classes, submitted the paperwork, and dealt with the bureaucracy. You have to stay after them, keeping your benefits moving forward. It’s up to you to make it work with your overall transition plan,” he says.
  His job search was one month shy of the full year he’d expected. He looked for work during his training and says he would have finished the certification programs even if he’d been hired before completing them.
  “People should not feel guilty” about accepting government aid, he says. “I saw this in a lot of people. They felt they were some kind of loser for taking benefits. My advice is: Get all you can. You’ve been paying for these programs in your entire career, and you may as well start to benefit from them.”
  Family Matters
  In addition to pursuing training or volunteering, some displaced careerists use their time off work to attend to family matters. Many executives rediscover their children or find time to help their parents.
  Stanford Rappaport held three jobs in San Francisco, including high-tech and teaching positions. When he was laid off from the high-tech job last year, he knew it might be a long slog before he could get another post like it in the Bay Area. “I was able to do the math,” says Mr. Rappaport, 46. “The number of people laid off: huge; and the number of available jobs: miniscule. At the time, I thought it might be two or three years before the tech industry recovered.”
  Mr. Rappaport’s remaining job, a part-time faculty position with City College of San Francisco, didn’t pay enough to support him. After a couple of months of searching with no results, he decided to escape the Northern California jobs meltdown. “My plan,” he says, “was to get out of an expensive living situation, and either seek work in another section of the U.S. or overseas, for those two years.” Mr. Rappaport, who speaks five languages, had worked overseas before.
  Before he found an assignment, his Arkansas-based mother was diagnosed with a serious chronic illness, and he was called into duty as a son. Mr. Rappaport was able to help his mother get her affairs in order not to interrupt his search by using a San Francisco mail drop and cellphone. “I continued to look for work in California while I was in Fayetteville, Ark., helping my mother through this crisis.”
  He took his mother to medical appointments, made repairs on her house, bought her a better car, and straightened out her legal and financial affairs. “I even got to go through my father’s effects, which in the five years since he had died were simply piled in boxes in his office,” he says.
  Mr. Rappaport’s stay in Arkansas lasted six months. “It’s amazing that at this stage I had the opportunity to spend a significant amount of time with my mother and improve her life and get a lot of things done for her. Most people never have that opportunity. I’m very thankful that I had the chance. It was absolutely worth it,” he says. 
  One of the unexpected benefits was the huge boost in confidence he gained from his role as caregiver. He’d been feeling depressed and defeated when he left California, but after returning, he felt renewed. He landed a job with a former employer after returning to San Francisco and remains a part-time faculty member.
  Discovery and Exploration
  Instead of spending time off lamenting your unemployed status, ask yourself: “Is there something I’ve always wanted to do but haven’t because of the demands of my job?”
  Felice Fisk, a 29?year?old in Seattle, recently left an account-manager position at a contract-furniture company. During seven months of unemployment, she took an interest in fine-art painting and completed 18 pieces before returning to work. “I found the art work, or some kind of creative outlet, to be really beneficial,” she says. She’s now an interior designer for an interior-design firm.
  Michael Ross, 42, a former IT administrator in El Cerrito, Calif., recently spent his 10 months of unemployment playing guitar and exploring his lifelong interest in scriptwriting and the movie business. “After 18 years at my former employer and how hard I had worked, I knew I had to recover, to get restored,” he says. “I looked at this as an opportunity, rather than a penalty. This was very much about clearing space for me.”
  At the executive level, even a very efficient and successful job search may be quite lengthy. It makes sense to spend that time in an enriching and productive manner. These job seekers pursued service, continuing education and shoring up family bonds. How you’ll look back on a period of unemployment depends on what you do with it.
  1. This passage mainly tells that being unemployed is not all bad.
  2. Lisa Perez found a new interest in homemaking during the period of unemployment.
  3. Lisa Perez was always optimistic during the period of her unemployment.
  4. After she got a new job, Lisa Perez regretted that she had not done volunteering work earlier.
  5. Unemployment means a lot of time, especially for those hard-charging executives who are not used to having any          time.
  6. Being a volunteer is helpful because volunteer assignments can provide you with chances to meet               people.
  7. Mr. Bellavance cashed out his pension, sold his house and unloaded things he didn’t need at garage after losing his job in order to change his finances into        mode.
  8. When unemployed, some careerists take the opportunity to      family matters in addition to pursuing training or volunteering.
  9. The role as caregiver brought about a huge boost in        to Mr. Rappaport. After returning from California, he felt renewed.
  10. Michael Ross resigned and spent his unemployment time playing guitar and exploring his lifelong interest in scriptwriting and the movie business for he looked at this as an            , rather than a penalty.
Part ⅤError Correction (15 minutes)
  Directions: This part consists of a short passage. In this passage, there are altogether 10 mistakes, one in each numbered line. You may have to change a word, add a word or delete a word. Mark out the mistakes and put the corrections in the blanks provided.If you change a word, cross it out and write the correct word in the corresponding blank. If you add a word, put an insertion mark(∧) in the right place and write the missing word in the blank. If you delete a word, cross it out and  put a slash26 (/) in the blank.
  Teachers believe that students’  responsibility with          62       
  
 learning is necessary. If a long reading assignment is
  given, instructors27 expect students to be familiar with the
  informations in the reading even if they do not discuss it in        63        
  
class or give an examination. The ideal student is
  considered to be one who motivated to learn for the sake of        64        
  
learning, not the one who is interested only in getting high
  grades. Grade-conscious students may be frustrated28 with
  teachers who do not believe it is necessary to grade every
  assignment. Sometimes homework is returned with brief
  writing comments but without a grade. When research is           65        
  
assigned, the professor expects the student to make the            66       
  
initiative and complete the assignment with minimal29
  guidance.Professors do not have time to explain how the
  library works; they expect students, particular graduate            67       
  
students, to be able to use the reference sources in the
  library.In the United States, professors have other duties
  except teaching. Often they either have administrative30 work        68       
  
to do or may be obliged to publish articles and books. But         69       
  
the time that a professor can spend with a student outside of
  class is very limited. Educational practices such as student
  participation31 indicates a respect for individual responsibility        70       
  
and independence. The manner which education is                71       
  
provided in any country reflects basic cultural and social
  beliefs of that country.
  
  Part ⅥTranslation (5 minutes)
  Directions: Complete the following sentences on Answer Sheet 2 by translating into English the Chinese given in brackets.
  72. The author of the report       (对医院的问题非常了解)because he has been working there for many years.
  73. The father       (哀求)his son to be less trouble to his mother.
  74. The murderer       (混在人群当中)with an attempt to shoot at the Prime Minister whenever he seized a chance.
  75.       (为了最大限度减少窃案发生的可能性), install a good alarm system.
  76. Scientists will have to       (提出增加世界粮食供应量的新方法).
参考答案 : Part Writing To Curb Spending? The monthly expenditures32 of college students have been on the rise in the past few years. Some argue that if the students earn the money themselves, how they spend it is none of other peoples business, and after all, the general living standard keeps rising. However, the fact is that most students live on the money their parents give them. The lure33 of a more comfortable and fashionable lifestyle—one with name brand clothing, mobile phones, MP3, and dining out or going to bars with a girlfriend—makes many to be frequent borrowers. In my opinion, young students are sensitive to fashions and new trends, thus they easily found it impossible to make ends meet and run into debt.  When a students spending steps beyond the boundaries of daily necessities, it becomes a kind of waste. Furthermore, widespread extravagant34 spending on campus could have a bad influence on peoples values. But many students see it as a common practice and not a fault. Though everyone has the right to enjoy a comfortable life, campus is a place for study. So just think twice before you sign a bill.   Part Reading Comprehension (Skimming and Scanning) 1. Y     2. N     3. N     4. NG       5. free  6. powerful and well-connected 7. survival     8. attend to     9. confidence     10. opportunity   Part Reading Comprehension (Reading in Depth) Section A 47. Southern manuscripts and letters. 48. As a forger35. 49. a respectable buyer 50. She was an imaginary person created by Spring. 51. the originals   Section B Passage One 52. B     53. A     54. A    55.B    56. B Passage Two 57. A     58. D     59. B    60. A    61. D Part Error Correction 62. withfor 63. informationsinformation 64. who∧→is 65. writingwritten 66. maketake 67. particularparticularly 68. exceptbesides 69. Butthus/therefore/hence/so 70. indicatesindicate 71. which/或者∧whichin   Part Translation 72. is well acquainted with the problems in the hospital 73. pleaded with 74. mingled36 with the crowds 75. To minimize the risk of theft 76. come up with new methods of increasing the worlds food supply


点击收听单词发音收听单词发音  

1 curb LmRyy     
n.场外证券市场,场外交易;vt.制止,抑制
参考例句:
  1. I could not curb my anger.我按捺不住我的愤怒。
  2. You must curb your daughter when you are in church.你在教堂时必须管住你的女儿。
2 previously bkzzzC     
adv.以前,先前(地)
参考例句:
  1. The bicycle tyre blew out at a previously damaged point.自行车胎在以前损坏过的地方又爆开了。
  2. Let me digress for a moment and explain what had happened previously.让我岔开一会儿,解释原先发生了什么。
3 obsessed 66a4be1417f7cf074208a6d81c8f3384     
adj.心神不宁的,鬼迷心窍的,沉迷的
参考例句:
  1. He's obsessed by computers. 他迷上了电脑。
  2. The fear of death obsessed him throughout his old life. 他晚年一直受着死亡恐惧的困扰。
4 stint 9GAzB     
v.节省,限制,停止;n.舍不得化,节约,限制;连续不断的一段时间从事某件事
参考例句:
  1. He lavished money on his children without stint.他在孩子们身上花钱毫不吝惜。
  2. We hope that you will not stint your criticism.我们希望您不吝指教。
5 helping 2rGzDc     
n.食物的一份&adj.帮助人的,辅助的
参考例句:
  1. The poor children regularly pony up for a second helping of my hamburger. 那些可怜的孩子们总是要求我把我的汉堡包再给他们一份。
  2. By doing this, they may at times be helping to restore competition. 这样一来, 他在某些时候,有助于竞争的加强。
6 consultant 2v0zp3     
n.顾问;会诊医师,专科医生
参考例句:
  1. He is a consultant on law affairs to the mayor.他是市长的一个法律顾问。
  2. Originally,Gar had agreed to come up as a consultant.原来,加尔只答应来充当我们的顾问。
7 decided lvqzZd     
adj.决定了的,坚决的;明显的,明确的
参考例句:
  1. This gave them a decided advantage over their opponents.这使他们比对手具有明显的优势。
  2. There is a decided difference between British and Chinese way of greeting.英国人和中国人打招呼的方式有很明显的区别。
8 bolstered 8f664011b293bfe505d7464c8bed65c8     
v.支持( bolster的过去式和过去分词 );支撑;给予必要的支持;援助
参考例句:
  1. He bolstered his plea with new evidence. 他举出新的证据来支持他的抗辩。 来自《现代英汉综合大词典》
  2. The data must be bolstered by inferences and indirect estimates of varying degrees of reliability. 这些资料必须借助于推理及可靠程度不同的间接估计。 来自辞典例句
9 full-time SsBz42     
adj.满工作日的或工作周的,全时间的
参考例句:
  1. A full-time job may be too much for her.全天工作她恐怕吃不消。
  2. I don't know how she copes with looking after her family and doing a full-time job.既要照顾家庭又要全天工作,我不知道她是如何对付的。
10 unemployed lfIz5Q     
adj.失业的,没有工作的;未动用的,闲置的
参考例句:
  1. There are now over four million unemployed workers in this country.这个国家现有四百万失业人员。
  2. The unemployed hunger for jobs.失业者渴望得到工作。
11 gene WgKxx     
n.遗传因子,基因
参考例句:
  1. A single gene may have many effects.单一基因可能具有很多种效应。
  2. The targeting of gene therapy has been paid close attention.其中基因治疗的靶向性是值得密切关注的问题之一。
12 immediate aapxh     
adj.立即的;直接的,最接近的;紧靠的
参考例句:
  1. His immediate neighbours felt it their duty to call.他的近邻认为他们有责任去拜访。
  2. We declared ourselves for the immediate convocation of the meeting.我们主张立即召开这个会议。
13 prospects fkVzpY     
n.希望,前途(恒为复数)
参考例句:
  1. There is a mood of pessimism in the company about future job prospects. 公司中有一种对工作前景悲观的情绪。
  2. They are less sanguine about the company's long-term prospects. 他们对公司的远景不那么乐观。
14 bleak gtWz5     
adj.(天气)阴冷的;凄凉的;暗淡的
参考例句:
  1. They showed me into a bleak waiting room.他们引我来到一间阴冷的会客室。
  2. The company's prospects look pretty bleak.这家公司的前景异常暗淡。
15 certified fw5zkU     
a.经证明合格的;具有证明文件的
参考例句:
  1. Doctors certified him as insane. 医生证明他精神失常。
  2. The planes were certified airworthy. 飞机被证明适于航行。
16 pervasive T3zzH     
adj.普遍的;遍布的,(到处)弥漫的;渗透性的
参考例句:
  1. It is the most pervasive compound on earth.它是地球上最普遍的化合物。
  2. The adverse health effects of car exhaust are pervasive and difficult to measure.汽车尾气对人类健康所构成的有害影响是普遍的,并且难以估算。
17 high-tech high-tech     
adj.高科技的
参考例句:
  1. The economy is in the upswing which makes high-tech services in more demand too.经济在蓬勃发展,这就使对高科技服务的需求量也在加大。
  2. The quest of a cure for disease with high-tech has never ceased. 人们希望运用高科技治疗疾病的追求从未停止过。
18 faculty HhkzK     
n.才能;学院,系;(学院或系的)全体教学人员
参考例句:
  1. He has a great faculty for learning foreign languages.他有学习外语的天赋。
  2. He has the faculty of saying the right thing at the right time.他有在恰当的时候说恰当的话的才智。
19 chronic BO9zl     
adj.(疾病)长期未愈的,慢性的;极坏的
参考例句:
  1. Famine differs from chronic malnutrition.饥荒不同于慢性营养不良。
  2. Chronic poisoning may lead to death from inanition.慢性中毒也可能由虚弱导致死亡。
20 depressed xu8zp9     
adj.沮丧的,抑郁的,不景气的,萧条的
参考例句:
  1. When he was depressed,he felt utterly divorced from reality.他心情沮丧时就感到完全脱离了现实。
  2. His mother was depressed by the sad news.这个坏消息使他的母亲意志消沉。
21 remains 1kMzTy     
n.剩余物,残留物;遗体,遗迹
参考例句:
  1. He ate the remains of food hungrily.他狼吞虎咽地吃剩余的食物。
  2. The remains of the meal were fed to the dog.残羹剩饭喂狗了。
22 lamenting 6491a9a531ff875869932a35fccf8e7d     
adj.悲伤的,悲哀的v.(为…)哀悼,痛哭,悲伤( lament的现在分词 )
参考例句:
  1. Katydids were lamenting fall's approach. 蝈蝈儿正为秋天临近而哀鸣。 来自《现代汉英综合大词典》
  2. Lamenting because the papers hadn't been destroyed and the money kept. 她正在吃后悔药呢,后悔自己没有毁了那张字条,把钱昧下来! 来自英汉文学 - 败坏赫德莱堡
23 outlet ZJFxG     
n.出口/路;销路;批发商店;通风口;发泄
参考例句:
  1. The outlet of a water pipe was blocked.水管的出水口堵住了。
  2. Running is a good outlet for his energy.跑步是他发泄过剩精力的好方法。
24 administrator SJeyZ     
n.经营管理者,行政官员
参考例句:
  1. The role of administrator absorbed much of Ben's energy.行政职务耗掉本很多精力。
  2. He has proved himself capable as administrator.他表现出管理才能。
25 lengthy f36yA     
adj.漫长的,冗长的
参考例句:
  1. We devoted a lengthy and full discussion to this topic.我们对这个题目进行了长时间的充分讨论。
  2. The professor wrote a lengthy book on Napoleon.教授写了一部有关拿破仑的巨著。
26 slash Hrsyq     
vi.大幅度削减;vt.猛砍,尖锐抨击,大幅减少;n.猛砍,斜线,长切口,衣衩
参考例句:
  1. The shop plans to slash fur prices after Spring Festival.该店计划在春节之后把皮货降价。
  2. Don't slash your horse in that cruel way.不要那样残忍地鞭打你的马。
27 instructors 5ea75ff41aa7350c0e6ef0bd07031aa4     
指导者,教师( instructor的名词复数 )
参考例句:
  1. The instructors were slacking on the job. 教员们对工作松松垮垮。
  2. He was invited to sit on the rostrum as a representative of extramural instructors. 他以校外辅导员身份,被邀请到主席台上。
28 frustrated ksWz5t     
adj.挫败的,失意的,泄气的v.使不成功( frustrate的过去式和过去分词 );挫败;使受挫折;令人沮丧
参考例句:
  1. It's very easy to get frustrated in this job. 这个工作很容易令人懊恼。
  2. The bad weather frustrated all our hopes of going out. 恶劣的天气破坏了我们出行的愿望。 来自《简明英汉词典》
29 minimal ODjx6     
adj.尽可能少的,最小的
参考例句:
  1. They referred to this kind of art as minimal art.他们把这种艺术叫微型艺术。
  2. I stayed with friends, so my expenses were minimal.我住在朋友家,所以我的花费很小。
30 administrative fzDzkc     
adj.行政的,管理的
参考例句:
  1. The administrative burden must be lifted from local government.必须解除地方政府的行政负担。
  2. He regarded all these administrative details as beneath his notice.他认为行政管理上的这些琐事都不值一顾。
31 participation KS9zu     
n.参与,参加,分享
参考例句:
  1. Some of the magic tricks called for audience participation.有些魔术要求有观众的参与。
  2. The scheme aims to encourage increased participation in sporting activities.这个方案旨在鼓励大众更多地参与体育活动。
32 expenditures 2af585403f5a51eeaa8f7b29110cc2ab     
n.花费( expenditure的名词复数 );使用;(尤指金钱的)支出额;(精力、时间、材料等的)耗费
参考例句:
  1. We have overspent.We'll have to let up our expenditures next month. 我们已经超支了,下个月一定得节约开支。 来自《简明英汉词典》
  2. The pension includes an allowance of fifty pounds for traffic expenditures. 年金中包括50镑交通费补贴。 来自《简明英汉词典》
33 lure l8Gz2     
n.吸引人的东西,诱惑物;vt.引诱,吸引
参考例句:
  1. Life in big cities is a lure for many country boys.大城市的生活吸引着许多乡下小伙子。
  2. He couldn't resist the lure of money.他不能抵制金钱的诱惑。
34 extravagant M7zya     
adj.奢侈的;过分的;(言行等)放肆的
参考例句:
  1. They tried to please him with fulsome compliments and extravagant gifts.他们想用溢美之词和奢华的礼品来取悦他。
  2. He is extravagant in behaviour.他行为放肆。
35 forger ji1xg     
v.伪造;n.(钱、文件等的)伪造者
参考例句:
  1. He admitted seven charges including forging passports.他承认了7项罪名,其中包括伪造护照。
  2. She alleged that Taylor had forged her signature on the form.她声称泰勒在表格上伪造了她的签名。
36 mingled fdf34efd22095ed7e00f43ccc823abdf     
混合,混入( mingle的过去式和过去分词 ); 混进,与…交往[联系]
参考例句:
  1. The sounds of laughter and singing mingled in the evening air. 笑声和歌声交织在夜空中。
  2. The man and the woman mingled as everyone started to relax. 当大家开始放松的时候,这一男一女就开始交往了。
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